Lenin’s Role in the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917

Lenin's Role in the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 Essay: Lenin’s Role in the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917
Language: English
Author: Susan Demaree
Pages: 7
Rating: 5 stars

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Lenin’s Role in the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917

After March 1917, the Russian revolution was yet to be completed. The
Tsar had been overthrown, the power and responsibility of the
government of Russia had been passed on ‘duelly’ to the Provincial
Government and the workers Soviet, the most powerful Soviet in
Petrograd. In November 1917, the second revolution was planned, a
Bolshevik revolution. Evidence around the Bolshevik revolution is not
completely reliable, but it is widely agreed that events in November
1917 were not as the Bolsheviks later described and boasted.

Soviet censored films, art and literature after 1917 record an
incredibly contradictory image of the November revolution than the
picture that is the truth. In Eisenstein’s film ‘October’ that was
made in 1927, the storming of the Winter Palace where the Provincial
Government were, was shown as a heroic, brave, but a violent struggle
of the Russian masses overcoming a government that they thought had no
interest in the people’s wishes. The film portrays the Russian spirit
standing up against hunger, war and laws that prevented peasants from
owning land, and how it was by their sheer will and force that the
government was overthrown. This myth perhaps continues into the role
of Lenin in the Bolshevik revolution. In the film ‘October’, Lenin is
portrayed as an inspiring, courageous, all great leader who was
followed by thousands of Russians. This is simply not the complete
real case. As one witness describes, “I heard shouting in the street
of Lenin! Lenin!, but we had no idea who this Lenin was.” It is
interesting to note that it took a further three years for Lenin …

Lenin’s Role in the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917

After March 1917, the Russian revolution was yet to be completed. The
Tsar had been overthrown, the power and responsibility of the
government of Russia had been passed on ‘duelly’ to the Provincial
Government and the workers Soviet, the most powerful Soviet in
Petrograd. In November 1917, the second revolution was planned, a
Bolshevik revolution. Evidence around the Bolshevik revolution is not
completely reliable, but it is widely agreed that events in November
1917 were not as the Bolsheviks later described and boasted.

Soviet censored films, art and literature after 1917 record an
incredibly contradictory image of the November revolution than the
picture that is the truth. In Eisenstein’s film ‘October’ that was
made in 1927, the storming of the Winter Palace where the Provincial
Government were, was shown as a heroic, brave, but a violent struggle
of the Russian masses overcoming a government that they thought had no
interest in the people’s wishes. The film portrays the Russian spirit
standing up against hunger, war and laws that prevented peasants from
owning land, and how it was by their sheer will and force that the
government was overthrown. This myth perhaps continues into the role
of Lenin in the Bolshevik revolution. In the film ‘October’, Lenin is
portrayed as an inspiring, courageous, all great leader who was
followed by thousands of Russians. This is simply not the complete
real case. As one witness describes, “I heard shouting in the street
of Lenin! Lenin!, but we had no idea who this Lenin was.” It is
interesting to note that it took a further three years for Lenin …

Vladimir Lenin

Vladimir Lenin Essay: Vladimir Lenin
Language: English
Author: Susan Demaree
Pages: 5
Rating: 3 stars

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Vladimir Lenin Vladimir Lenin was the Bolshevik leader. He was a clever thinker and
a practical man, he knew how to take advantage
of events. When Lenin arrived in Russia, he issued a document called
the April theses, promising ‘peace, bread, land and freedom’. He
called for an end to the ‘Capitalist’ war, and demanded that power
should be given to the soviets. He demanded a revolution against the
Provisional Government as soon as possible. In November 1917, under
the leadership of Lenin and Trotsky, the Bolsheviks overthrew the
Provisional government, beginning the era of Communist rule in Russia.
Stalin played no real part in the events of the revolution. The
revolution was the result of detailed Bolshevik planning, and of the
failures and weaknesses of the Provisional government. Lenin knew that
there was enough discontent amongst the people for a revolution to
work. By October 1917 the Bolsheviks controlled both the Petrograd and
the Moscow Soviets. His slogans and policies were popular with the
people. In 1918 Lenin introduced the policy of War Communism, in order
to ensure that the Red Army was well supplied during the Civil War.
All industries were nationalised. Yet production fell as workers were
conscripted the Red Army. In agriculture, the Cheka were sent into the
countryside to seize all surplus grain and produce. Anyone who
resisted was shot. Yet the simple effect of this was that peasants
produced less food, so there were fewer surpluses to take. This helped
to cause the dreadful famine of 1921. War communism was s…

Vladimir Lenin Vladimir Lenin was the Bolshevik leader. He was a clever thinker and
a practical man, he knew how to take advantage
of events. When Lenin arrived in Russia, he issued a document called
the April theses, promising ‘peace, bread, land and freedom’. He
called for an end to the ‘Capitalist’ war, and demanded that power
should be given to the soviets. He demanded a revolution against the
Provisional Government as soon as possible. In November 1917, under
the leadership of Lenin and Trotsky, the Bolsheviks overthrew the
Provisional government, beginning the era of Communist rule in Russia.
Stalin played no real part in the events of the revolution. The
revolution was the result of detailed Bolshevik planning, and of the
failures and weaknesses of the Provisional government. Lenin knew that
there was enough discontent amongst the people for a revolution to
work. By October 1917 the Bolsheviks controlled both the Petrograd and
the Moscow Soviets. His slogans and policies were popular with the
people. In 1918 Lenin introduced the policy of War Communism, in order
to ensure that the Red Army was well supplied during the Civil War.
All industries were nationalised. Yet production fell as workers were
conscripted the Red Army. In agriculture, the Cheka were sent into the
countryside to seize all surplus grain and produce. Anyone who
resisted was shot. Yet the simple effect of this was that peasants
produced less food, so there were fewer surpluses to take. This helped
to cause the dreadful famine of 1921. War communism was s…

The Ideals of Marx, Engels, Lenin, Mao, and Stalin

The Ideals of Marx, Engels, Lenin, Mao, and Stalin Essay: The Ideals of Marx, Engels, Lenin, Mao, and Stalin
Language: English
Author: Chelsea Hudkins
Pages: 8
Rating: 4 stars

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1. Scientific Socialism

Scientific socialism is the type of socialism that Engels uses to refer to Marx’s analysis of political history. Scientific socialism exams social and economic methods’ using the scientific method and it tries to mimic the hard sciences like chemistry and physics. Scientific socialism is different from utopian socialism because it takes into consideration the historical developments of men while utopian socialism does not. According to Engels when referring to utopian socialist, “To all these, socialism is the expression of absolute truth, reason and justice, and has only to be discovered to conquer all the world by virtue of its own power. And as absolute truth is independent of time, space, and of the historical development of man, it is a mere accident when and where it is discovered” (13). Utopian socialist view socialism as an ideal, perfect and absolute, which does not allow theories to be disproven nor does it explain how things occurred. On the other hand, scientific socialism allows theories to be proved or disproved using the scientific method. In addition, scientific socialism can explain details as well as predict an outcome using historical empirical data and observation. Therefore, Engels expressed that scientific socialism was a more improved socialism than utopian socialism.
Marx’s socialism is scientific by Engels perspective because Marx’s socialism explains the beginning of both capitalist production and the production of capital. Specifically, if allowed a more detailed account of an economic method derived in a more scientific way. According to Engels, “The socialism of earlier days certainly criticized the existing capitalistic mode of production and its consequences. But it…

1. Scientific Socialism

Scientific socialism is the type of socialism that Engels uses to refer to Marx’s analysis of political history. Scientific socialism exams social and economic methods’ using the scientific method and it tries to mimic the hard sciences like chemistry and physics. Scientific socialism is different from utopian socialism because it takes into consideration the historical developments of men while utopian socialism does not. According to Engels when referring to utopian socialist, “To all these, socialism is the expression of absolute truth, reason and justice, and has only to be discovered to conquer all the world by virtue of its own power. And as absolute truth is independent of time, space, and of the historical development of man, it is a mere accident when and where it is discovered” (13). Utopian socialist view socialism as an ideal, perfect and absolute, which does not allow theories to be disproven nor does it explain how things occurred. On the other hand, scientific socialism allows theories to be proved or disproved using the scientific method. In addition, scientific socialism can explain details as well as predict an outcome using historical empirical data and observation. Therefore, Engels expressed that scientific socialism was a more improved socialism than utopian socialism.
Marx’s socialism is scientific by Engels perspective because Marx’s socialism explains the beginning of both capitalist production and the production of capital. Specifically, if allowed a more detailed account of an economic method derived in a more scientific way. According to Engels, “The socialism of earlier days certainly criticized the existing capitalistic mode of production and its consequences. But it…

Lenin’s Economic Policies in 1924

Lenin's Economic Policies in 1924 Essay: Lenin’s Economic Policies in 1924
Language: English
Author: Paul Mason
Pages: 12
Rating: 4 stars

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Lenin’s Economic Policies in 1924

When the Bolsheviks seized power in October 1917 they inherited many
of the problems faced by the old Tsarist regime as well as those of
the Provisional Government after the Tsars abdication. Lenin, as
leader of the Bolsheviks took many measures to try and solve these
problems, each with varying degrees of success. This essay will,
therefore, go on to look at and discuss the various measures that
Lenin and the Bolshevik party took, and, whether these measures
created more problems for Russia in the end or in fact made
significant progress towards the communist society that Lenin had
prophesised for Russia.

In the early days of Bolshevik rule, there were many problems facing
Lenin. As communication was poor to the rural areas of Russia, the
peasants had little or no knowledge of political parties and so did
not support the Bolsheviks in their takeover. When the Bolsheviks
changed to the Communist party in 1918, many peasants believed these
to be a new party challenging Bolshevism and so made banners saying
’Down with the Communists, Long live the Bolsheviks!’ The national
minorities currently part of the Russian empire, predominately Finland
and Poland, were demanding independence and Russia’s allies, Britain,
France, USA, Japan, etc. were growing ever suspicious of Bolshevism
and so were set to intervene if the Bolsheviks were to pull out of
World War 1. Along with this massive group of opponents, Lenin also
faced acute starvation as little grain was being produced and this
lead to high inflation and so quick action was needed if Lenin was to
keep his promise of bread to the people.

The…

Lenin’s Economic Policies in 1924

When the Bolsheviks seized power in October 1917 they inherited many
of the problems faced by the old Tsarist regime as well as those of
the Provisional Government after the Tsars abdication. Lenin, as
leader of the Bolsheviks took many measures to try and solve these
problems, each with varying degrees of success. This essay will,
therefore, go on to look at and discuss the various measures that
Lenin and the Bolshevik party took, and, whether these measures
created more problems for Russia in the end or in fact made
significant progress towards the communist society that Lenin had
prophesised for Russia.

In the early days of Bolshevik rule, there were many problems facing
Lenin. As communication was poor to the rural areas of Russia, the
peasants had little or no knowledge of political parties and so did
not support the Bolsheviks in their takeover. When the Bolsheviks
changed to the Communist party in 1918, many peasants believed these
to be a new party challenging Bolshevism and so made banners saying
’Down with the Communists, Long live the Bolsheviks!’ The national
minorities currently part of the Russian empire, predominately Finland
and Poland, were demanding independence and Russia’s allies, Britain,
France, USA, Japan, etc. were growing ever suspicious of Bolshevism
and so were set to intervene if the Bolsheviks were to pull out of
World War 1. Along with this massive group of opponents, Lenin also
faced acute starvation as little grain was being produced and this
lead to high inflation and so quick action was needed if Lenin was to
keep his promise of bread to the people.

The…

Lenin Laid the Foundation for Stalinism

Lenin Laid the Foundation for Stalinism Essay: Lenin Laid the Foundation for Stalinism
Language: English
Author: Susan Demaree
Pages: 10
Rating: 5 stars

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In order to establish whether Lenin did, indeed lay the foundation for Stalinism, two
questions need to be answered, what were Lenin’s plans for the future
of Russia and what exactly gave rise to Stalinism? Official Soviet
historians of the time at which Stalin was in power would have argued
that each one answers the other. Similarly, Western historians saw
Lenin as an important figure in the establishment of Stalin’s
socialist state. This can be partly attributed to the prevailing
current of pro-Stalin anti-Hitler sentiments amongst westerners until
the outbreak of the cold war. As relations changed between Russia and
the rest of the world, so did the main historical schools of thought.
Following Stalins death, hostilities between the capitalist powers and
the USSR, along with an increased awareness of the atrocities that
were previously hidden and ignored, led to a split in the opinions of
Soviet and Western Liberal historians. In Russia, he was seen, as
Trotsky had always maintained, as a betrayer of the revolution,
therefore as much distance as possible was placed between himself and
Lenin in the schoolbooks of the 50s and early 60s in the USSR. These
historians point to Stalin’s killing of fellow communists as a marked
difference between himself and his predecessor. Trotsky himself
remarked that ‘The present purge draws between Bolshevism and
Stalinism… a whole river of blood’[1]. Liberal Western historians such
as Richard Pipes, who himself was an advisor to President Reagan, drew
lines of direct continuity between the two leaders, emphasising
Lenin’s use of terror and bans on factionalism which allowed Stalin to
come to power….

In order to establish whether Lenin did, indeed lay the foundation for Stalinism, two
questions need to be answered, what were Lenin’s plans for the future
of Russia and what exactly gave rise to Stalinism? Official Soviet
historians of the time at which Stalin was in power would have argued
that each one answers the other. Similarly, Western historians saw
Lenin as an important figure in the establishment of Stalin’s
socialist state. This can be partly attributed to the prevailing
current of pro-Stalin anti-Hitler sentiments amongst westerners until
the outbreak of the cold war. As relations changed between Russia and
the rest of the world, so did the main historical schools of thought.
Following Stalins death, hostilities between the capitalist powers and
the USSR, along with an increased awareness of the atrocities that
were previously hidden and ignored, led to a split in the opinions of
Soviet and Western Liberal historians. In Russia, he was seen, as
Trotsky had always maintained, as a betrayer of the revolution,
therefore as much distance as possible was placed between himself and
Lenin in the schoolbooks of the 50s and early 60s in the USSR. These
historians point to Stalin’s killing of fellow communists as a marked
difference between himself and his predecessor. Trotsky himself
remarked that ‘The present purge draws between Bolshevism and
Stalinism… a whole river of blood’[1]. Liberal Western historians such
as Richard Pipes, who himself was an advisor to President Reagan, drew
lines of direct continuity between the two leaders, emphasising
Lenin’s use of terror and bans on factionalism which allowed Stalin to
come to power….

Vladimir Lenin and Soviet Union Histoy

Vladimir Lenin and Soviet Union Histoy Essay: Vladimir Lenin and Soviet Union Histoy
Language: English
Author: Chelsea Hudkins
Pages: 13
Rating: 3 stars

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Research Essay
Vladimir Lenin officially took power of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic in 1917 with the Communist Party. The USSR broke into a civil war in 1918 occurring between the Red Army, consisting of Bolsheviks, and the White Army. The Red Army defeated the White Army by 1921 and the Communist Party gained complete power. Eventually the USSR was under War Communism, which further diminished its economy.
After Vladimir Lenin’s death, Joseph Stalin took control of Russia in 1924. He considered himself a Marxist. Stalin was a strong believer in Bolshevism and supported Lenin, until he came into power. Stalin eliminated everyone close to Lenin and established himself as dictator of Russia. He obliterated any opposition or anyone that challenged him. During the Great Purges of 1930s, Stalin executed or imprisoned 35,000 soldiers along with killing close to all significant leaders of the time. Though Stalin supported Lenin as a dictator, after Lenin’s death he stripped Russia of Lenin policies. Stalin began to form his own policies, which he enforced upon the people of Russia, under his dictatorship.
Research Stalin’s policy of collectivization. How did Stalin change Lenin’s policy? How did the Kulaks resist collectivization? What were the consequences of their resistance? Did the ends justify the means?
Joseph Stalin’s policies largely modified the Soviet Union between 1924-1941. He wished to grow Russia’s industry to be as developed and technologically advanced as countries such as Germany. His policy of collectivization was composed of the act of joining together farms to form large shared, or collective, farms. Stalin established policies to eradicate the rich farmers, known as Kulaks, of the Soviet Union. The…

Research Essay
Vladimir Lenin officially took power of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic in 1917 with the Communist Party. The USSR broke into a civil war in 1918 occurring between the Red Army, consisting of Bolsheviks, and the White Army. The Red Army defeated the White Army by 1921 and the Communist Party gained complete power. Eventually the USSR was under War Communism, which further diminished its economy.
After Vladimir Lenin’s death, Joseph Stalin took control of Russia in 1924. He considered himself a Marxist. Stalin was a strong believer in Bolshevism and supported Lenin, until he came into power. Stalin eliminated everyone close to Lenin and established himself as dictator of Russia. He obliterated any opposition or anyone that challenged him. During the Great Purges of 1930s, Stalin executed or imprisoned 35,000 soldiers along with killing close to all significant leaders of the time. Though Stalin supported Lenin as a dictator, after Lenin’s death he stripped Russia of Lenin policies. Stalin began to form his own policies, which he enforced upon the people of Russia, under his dictatorship.
Research Stalin’s policy of collectivization. How did Stalin change Lenin’s policy? How did the Kulaks resist collectivization? What were the consequences of their resistance? Did the ends justify the means?
Joseph Stalin’s policies largely modified the Soviet Union between 1924-1941. He wished to grow Russia’s industry to be as developed and technologically advanced as countries such as Germany. His policy of collectivization was composed of the act of joining together farms to form large shared, or collective, farms. Stalin established policies to eradicate the rich farmers, known as Kulaks, of the Soviet Union. The…

Lenin’s Revolution: From Marxism to Leninism

Lenin's Revolution: From Marxism to Leninism Essay: Lenin’s Revolution: From Marxism to Leninism
Language: English
Author: Paul Saez
Pages: 12
Rating: 4 stars

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As the Russian Revolution rose in 1917, so did a new political force known as Communism. When the Czarist autocracy was overthrown, there was now a need for a new government to rule Russia. After the abdication of the Russian throne and a civil war between the Bolsheviks (Red Army) and the Russian Republic (White Army), the Bolsheviks came out victorious and established themselves as the ruling party of Russia. Bolshevik leader, Vladimir Lenin, preached Karl Marx’s infamous pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto because he believed Communism was the ideal political system for Russia. Despite his beliefs in Marxism, Lenin felt that it had its limitations, therefore he applied Marxism to the extent he felt was necessary in establishing communism in Russia.
News of the Russian Revolution first reached Lenin by word of mouth while being exiled in Switzerland. Upon learning about the February Revolution and Czar Nicholas II’s abdication of the throne in 1917, Lenin made it his mission to return to Russia and be a part of the Revolution. While on a train en route to Russia, Lenin wrote what was to be known as his April Theses: his agenda for the Bolshevik Party. He felt that the February Revolution was just an initial stage of the revolution and now the proletarians needed to be organized in order to remove the bourgeoisie to ultimately place proletarians in power. Organizing the Proletarians would create a revolutionary vanguard party that would rule as a proletarian dictatorship. In Marxists terms a socialists dictatorship would allow for the proletariat to have political control. Marx states in his Manifesto that if the Proletarians were to be organized into a political party they would become a strong political force, “The organization …

As the Russian Revolution rose in 1917, so did a new political force known as Communism. When the Czarist autocracy was overthrown, there was now a need for a new government to rule Russia. After the abdication of the Russian throne and a civil war between the Bolsheviks (Red Army) and the Russian Republic (White Army), the Bolsheviks came out victorious and established themselves as the ruling party of Russia. Bolshevik leader, Vladimir Lenin, preached Karl Marx’s infamous pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto because he believed Communism was the ideal political system for Russia. Despite his beliefs in Marxism, Lenin felt that it had its limitations, therefore he applied Marxism to the extent he felt was necessary in establishing communism in Russia.
News of the Russian Revolution first reached Lenin by word of mouth while being exiled in Switzerland. Upon learning about the February Revolution and Czar Nicholas II’s abdication of the throne in 1917, Lenin made it his mission to return to Russia and be a part of the Revolution. While on a train en route to Russia, Lenin wrote what was to be known as his April Theses: his agenda for the Bolshevik Party. He felt that the February Revolution was just an initial stage of the revolution and now the proletarians needed to be organized in order to remove the bourgeoisie to ultimately place proletarians in power. Organizing the Proletarians would create a revolutionary vanguard party that would rule as a proletarian dictatorship. In Marxists terms a socialists dictatorship would allow for the proletariat to have political control. Marx states in his Manifesto that if the Proletarians were to be organized into a political party they would become a strong political force, “The organization …

Vladimir Lenin and The Red Terror

Vladimir Lenin and The Red Terror Essay: Vladimir Lenin and The Red Terror
Language: English
Author: Susan Demaree
Pages: 8
Rating: 4 stars

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Eventually, nations collapse and kingdoms fail, termination can occur through many causes. Whether through being ruled by a sequence of out of touch men, engaging in war, having too many enemies, or an amalgamation: no nation is safe. Russia in the year of 1910 was in an immensely horrible situation, she had all of these problems. If it was not for Vladimir IIich Lenin, Russia would not have existed by 1920.

Throughout the February Revolution Lenin was living in exile. In April 1917, Lenin returned to Russia with the help of the Germans. The Germans sent Lenin back to Russia in the hopes that he would encourage additional revolutionary movement in Russia so that Russia would withdraw from fighting Germany in World War I. The February Revolution had already occurred whilst Lenin was in Switzerland. Although this revolution succeeded in conquering Tsar, the provisional government temporarily in the place of Tsar was still committed to fighting Germany in the war. It was well known by the German people that the Russians wanted to terminate their participation in the war. The German High Command made the decision to send Lenin back to Russia with the hopes that he would weaken the provisional government and disrupt the army.

Lenin arrived in Germany in the spring of April 3rd 1917, by an organised guarded train that the Germans had set up. Upon Lenin’s arrival he was greeted enthusiastically, but to the crowd’s surprise Lenin showed hostility, criticizing the Provisional Government and the Petrograd Soviet. Not long after Lenin arrived he started to use propaganda, giving many speeches voicing for the conquest of the Provisional Government. On April 7, the Bolshevik newspaper printed the ideas enclosed in Lenin’s speeches…

Eventually, nations collapse and kingdoms fail, termination can occur through many causes. Whether through being ruled by a sequence of out of touch men, engaging in war, having too many enemies, or an amalgamation: no nation is safe. Russia in the year of 1910 was in an immensely horrible situation, she had all of these problems. If it was not for Vladimir IIich Lenin, Russia would not have existed by 1920.

Throughout the February Revolution Lenin was living in exile. In April 1917, Lenin returned to Russia with the help of the Germans. The Germans sent Lenin back to Russia in the hopes that he would encourage additional revolutionary movement in Russia so that Russia would withdraw from fighting Germany in World War I. The February Revolution had already occurred whilst Lenin was in Switzerland. Although this revolution succeeded in conquering Tsar, the provisional government temporarily in the place of Tsar was still committed to fighting Germany in the war. It was well known by the German people that the Russians wanted to terminate their participation in the war. The German High Command made the decision to send Lenin back to Russia with the hopes that he would weaken the provisional government and disrupt the army.

Lenin arrived in Germany in the spring of April 3rd 1917, by an organised guarded train that the Germans had set up. Upon Lenin’s arrival he was greeted enthusiastically, but to the crowd’s surprise Lenin showed hostility, criticizing the Provisional Government and the Petrograd Soviet. Not long after Lenin arrived he started to use propaganda, giving many speeches voicing for the conquest of the Provisional Government. On April 7, the Bolshevik newspaper printed the ideas enclosed in Lenin’s speeches…

Vladimir Lenin

Vladimir Lenin Essay: Vladimir Lenin
Language: English
Author: Chelsea Hudkins
Pages: 11
Rating: 5 stars

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Vladimir Lenin and his Rise to Power

Eventually, empires and nations all collapse. The end can be brought about by many causes. Whether through becoming too large for their own good, being ruled by a series of out of touch men, falling behind technologically, having too many enemies, succumbing to civil war, or a combination: no country is safe. The Russia of 1910 was in atremendously horrible situation. She had all of these problems. Russia would not have existed by 1920 were it not for Vladimir Ilich Lenin, the only man capable of saving the failing nation.

Russia in 1910 was a very backwards country. Peasants who lived in absolute poverty made up the vast majority of Russia’s population (Haney 19). Russia’s version of the feudal system had ended a mere 49 years earlier, but in effect it meant that peasants now owned the meager parcels of land upon which their survival rested. Their ruler, Czar Nicholas II, ruled aloof of his disorganized nation. His government of appointed officials and men in inherited positions did not represent the people (The Tyranny of Stupidity 120). Even though all of Europe had experienced the Industrial Revolution, Russia had precious little machinery. To obtain more advanced machines, the government traded grain to other countries in exchange for machinery, even though it meant that more people would starve (Haney 17). Compound this with the devastation and desperation brought on shortly thereafter by the First World War, and there was no confidence left in the government. Different political factions formed, and none got
along (U.S.S.R. 63). Liberal constitutionalists wanted to remove the czar and form a republic, social revolutionists tried to promote a peasant revolution, Marxists promoted a revolution among the proletariat, or urban working class. The people were fed up with Russia’s state of affairs and ready for the change.

Change was presented in the form of Vladimir Lenin, a committed,persuasive visionary with a grand plan. Lenin became hardened in his quest at an early age when his older brother Aleksandr, a revolutionary, was executed in 1887 for plotting to kill then-Czar
Alexander III. “I’ll make them pay for this!’, he said, “I swear it!’, (Haney 28) By 1888, at the age of 18, he had read Das Kapital by Karl Marx, a book about socialism and the evils of capitalism. A superb speaker, he…

Vladimir Lenin and his Rise to Power

Eventually, empires and nations all collapse. The end can be brought about by many causes. Whether through becoming too large for their own good, being ruled by a series of out of touch men, falling behind technologically, having too many enemies, succumbing to civil war, or a combination: no country is safe. The Russia of 1910 was in atremendously horrible situation. She had all of these problems. Russia would not have existed by 1920 were it not for Vladimir Ilich Lenin, the only man capable of saving the failing nation.

Russia in 1910 was a very backwards country. Peasants who lived in absolute poverty made up the vast majority of Russia’s population (Haney 19). Russia’s version of the feudal system had ended a mere 49 years earlier, but in effect it meant that peasants now owned the meager parcels of land upon which their survival rested. Their ruler, Czar Nicholas II, ruled aloof of his disorganized nation. His government of appointed officials and men in inherited positions did not represent the people (The Tyranny of Stupidity 120). Even though all of Europe had experienced the Industrial Revolution, Russia had precious little machinery. To obtain more advanced machines, the government traded grain to other countries in exchange for machinery, even though it meant that more people would starve (Haney 17). Compound this with the devastation and desperation brought on shortly thereafter by the First World War, and there was no confidence left in the government. Different political factions formed, and none got
along (U.S.S.R. 63). Liberal constitutionalists wanted to remove the czar and form a republic, social revolutionists tried to promote a peasant revolution, Marxists promoted a revolution among the proletariat, or urban working class. The people were fed up with Russia’s state of affairs and ready for the change.

Change was presented in the form of Vladimir Lenin, a committed,persuasive visionary with a grand plan. Lenin became hardened in his quest at an early age when his older brother Aleksandr, a revolutionary, was executed in 1887 for plotting to kill then-Czar
Alexander III. “I’ll make them pay for this!’, he said, “I swear it!’, (Haney 28) By 1888, at the age of 18, he had read Das Kapital by Karl Marx, a book about socialism and the evils of capitalism. A superb speaker, he…

Lenin’s Revolution

Lenin's Revolution Essay: Lenin’s Revolution
Language: English
Author: Paul Saez
Pages: 6
Rating: 4 stars

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Lenin’s Revolution

At the start of the 20th century, the ruling Tsar of Russia had absolute power and his Government was corrupt, hence, the majority of the people were against him. Vladimir Ilich Lenin, the leader of the Bolsheviks Socialist Party wanted a revolution to overthrow the Government. Relative to these times, it was Lenin who directed the course of the oncoming Russian October Revolution.

The outbreak of the unrest, in January 1905, found Lenin anxious to set down a novel strategy for revolution: the need for the proletariat (the working class) to win “hegemony” in the democratic revolution. He flatly declared to both major political parties of the time (the Bolsheviks and Mensheviks) that the proletariat was the driving force of the revolution and that its only reliable ally was the peasantry. He branded the bourgeoisie as hopelessly counterrevolutionary and too cowardly to make their own revolution. However, after the defeat of the Revolution of 1905, Lenin was forced into exile from 1907 to 1917. He found serious challenges to his policies not only from the Menshevik party (formed by the dissatisfied minority of the intelligentsia) but within his own faction as well. The combination of repression and modest reform effected by the tsarist regime led to a decline of party membership (Merringer 79). Disillusionment and despair in the chances of successful revolution swept the dwindled party ranks, rent by controversies over tactics and philosophy. Attempts to unite the Bolshevik and Menshevik factions came to naught, all breaking on Lenin’s intransigent insistence that his conditions for reunification be adopted. Yet, throughout the struggle, Lenin?s directing force was still felt by both the Bolsh…

Lenin’s Revolution

At the start of the 20th century, the ruling Tsar of Russia had absolute power and his Government was corrupt, hence, the majority of the people were against him. Vladimir Ilich Lenin, the leader of the Bolsheviks Socialist Party wanted a revolution to overthrow the Government. Relative to these times, it was Lenin who directed the course of the oncoming Russian October Revolution.

The outbreak of the unrest, in January 1905, found Lenin anxious to set down a novel strategy for revolution: the need for the proletariat (the working class) to win “hegemony” in the democratic revolution. He flatly declared to both major political parties of the time (the Bolsheviks and Mensheviks) that the proletariat was the driving force of the revolution and that its only reliable ally was the peasantry. He branded the bourgeoisie as hopelessly counterrevolutionary and too cowardly to make their own revolution. However, after the defeat of the Revolution of 1905, Lenin was forced into exile from 1907 to 1917. He found serious challenges to his policies not only from the Menshevik party (formed by the dissatisfied minority of the intelligentsia) but within his own faction as well. The combination of repression and modest reform effected by the tsarist regime led to a decline of party membership (Merringer 79). Disillusionment and despair in the chances of successful revolution swept the dwindled party ranks, rent by controversies over tactics and philosophy. Attempts to unite the Bolshevik and Menshevik factions came to naught, all breaking on Lenin’s intransigent insistence that his conditions for reunification be adopted. Yet, throughout the struggle, Lenin?s directing force was still felt by both the Bolsh…