Why did the Great Divergence Occur

Why did the Great Divergence Occur Essay: Why did the Great Divergence Occur
Language: English
Author: Chelsea Hudkins
Pages: 8
Rating: 3 stars

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The Great Divergence is term used to portray the gradual shift of dominance that Europe gained by establishing itself as the most powerful world civilization by the 19th century. While a case could be made that the Great Divergence occurred because of the pre-eminence of Europe and Britain, as well as their supposed superiority in invention and innovation above anywhere else in the world, this argument is flawed. A more compelling argument would be to state that it was rather through the geographical advantages that Europe obtained that lead it into eventually becoming the most powerful civilization after 1500 A.D., as this essay will strive to demonstrate.
A case could be made that the Great Divergence ultimately grew on the basis of European technological invention and innovation. According to historian David Landes, pre-eminence had been present since the Middle Ages, due to the inventions created that had allegedly aided society in an effective manner. Landes cites the inventions of the waterwheel, eyeglasses, and the mechanical clock as having had a great impact on society. It is to his belief that working life was increased and the manual labor decreased with the aid of the waterwheel, and that the invention of eyeglasses helped to path the way towards more revolutionary inventions such as the gauge, micrometer, telescope and microscope. He ultimately attempts to highlight the multitude of methods in which Europe utilized invention and innovation, prior to and after the Great Divergence.
Landes also portrays the supposed innovative manner in which Europe dealt with Chinese inventions. Despite printing having already been invented in China, the ideographic form of block printing limited distribution of publication, sugge…

The Great Divergence is term used to portray the gradual shift of dominance that Europe gained by establishing itself as the most powerful world civilization by the 19th century. While a case could be made that the Great Divergence occurred because of the pre-eminence of Europe and Britain, as well as their supposed superiority in invention and innovation above anywhere else in the world, this argument is flawed. A more compelling argument would be to state that it was rather through the geographical advantages that Europe obtained that lead it into eventually becoming the most powerful civilization after 1500 A.D., as this essay will strive to demonstrate.
A case could be made that the Great Divergence ultimately grew on the basis of European technological invention and innovation. According to historian David Landes, pre-eminence had been present since the Middle Ages, due to the inventions created that had allegedly aided society in an effective manner. Landes cites the inventions of the waterwheel, eyeglasses, and the mechanical clock as having had a great impact on society. It is to his belief that working life was increased and the manual labor decreased with the aid of the waterwheel, and that the invention of eyeglasses helped to path the way towards more revolutionary inventions such as the gauge, micrometer, telescope and microscope. He ultimately attempts to highlight the multitude of methods in which Europe utilized invention and innovation, prior to and after the Great Divergence.
Landes also portrays the supposed innovative manner in which Europe dealt with Chinese inventions. Despite printing having already been invented in China, the ideographic form of block printing limited distribution of publication, sugge…

Raphael Sanzio

Raphael Sanzio Essay: Raphael Sanzio
Language: English
Author: Paul Mason
Pages: 6
Rating: 4 stars

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Raphael Sanzio
Raphael was one of the most important artists of the Italian Renaissance. Raphael painted and designed many brilliant pieces of work and the stanzas inside the Vatican. He was a master at such necessities of modern art such as depth and perspective and the use of light and shadow, and was the turning point styles of paintings like the use of Madonnas in paintings. Through his short life, Raphael would make some of the most awe-inspiring, beautiful, and influential works of art during the Italian Renaissance.
Raphael whose full name was Raphael Sanzio, (also known as Raphael Sanzi), was born on April 6th, 1483. He was born in the town of Urbino, Italy, where he would spend his childhood life until he was 11 years old. His father, Giovanni Sanzio, was a painter for the court of Federigo da Montefeltro, and as well as being a painter, he was a bit of a poet. As a young boy, Raphael learned the basics of painting and art from his father. However, he would not live with his father very long, as his mother did several years before, Raphael’s father died when Raphael was 11.
After his father died, Raphael went to the town of Perugia to be an apprentice of the painter Pietro Perugino. Perugino was a well-respected artist during the Italian Renaissance. He had painted works in the Vatican, and he also created masterpieces like Christ Delivering the Keys of the Kingdom to St. Peter and The Deposition. For the ten to eleven years that Raphael studied and assisted Perugino, Raphael picked the habit of shade and light, and with Perugino, Raphael learned what he is very famous for: depth and perspective. After Perugino’s training, Raphael would eventually become a better artist than Perugino himself. However, even with Perug…

Raphael Sanzio
Raphael was one of the most important artists of the Italian Renaissance. Raphael painted and designed many brilliant pieces of work and the stanzas inside the Vatican. He was a master at such necessities of modern art such as depth and perspective and the use of light and shadow, and was the turning point styles of paintings like the use of Madonnas in paintings. Through his short life, Raphael would make some of the most awe-inspiring, beautiful, and influential works of art during the Italian Renaissance.
Raphael whose full name was Raphael Sanzio, (also known as Raphael Sanzi), was born on April 6th, 1483. He was born in the town of Urbino, Italy, where he would spend his childhood life until he was 11 years old. His father, Giovanni Sanzio, was a painter for the court of Federigo da Montefeltro, and as well as being a painter, he was a bit of a poet. As a young boy, Raphael learned the basics of painting and art from his father. However, he would not live with his father very long, as his mother did several years before, Raphael’s father died when Raphael was 11.
After his father died, Raphael went to the town of Perugia to be an apprentice of the painter Pietro Perugino. Perugino was a well-respected artist during the Italian Renaissance. He had painted works in the Vatican, and he also created masterpieces like Christ Delivering the Keys of the Kingdom to St. Peter and The Deposition. For the ten to eleven years that Raphael studied and assisted Perugino, Raphael picked the habit of shade and light, and with Perugino, Raphael learned what he is very famous for: depth and perspective. After Perugino’s training, Raphael would eventually become a better artist than Perugino himself. However, even with Perug…

Main Aspects of Education: An Argument for Experience, Curiosity, and Commitment

Main Aspects of Education: An Argument for Experience, Curiosity, and Commitment Essay: Main Aspects of Education: An Argument for Experience, Curiosity, and Commitment
Language: English
Author: Anthony Cowden
Pages: 16
Rating: 4 stars

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Education is one of the most difficult matters in human life, because it involves the society as a whole and the individual. People have many different ways of learning, and often these methods fall into what are called, traditional and nontraditional educations. Traditional education is to attend classes at school where there are teachers and pupils. Nontraditional education may involve traveling, hands-on experiences, or reading. However, these two types of education are based upon five components of education: experience, curiosity, mentoring, communication, and commitment.
No matter what we do or where we go, as long as we face new obstacles, we are learning. In Ryszard Kapuscinski’s Travels with Herodotus, Kapuscinski immerses himself in several different foreign countries, constantly picking up cues on the culture and mannerisms of the different people in the regions. Kapuscinski is inspired by Herodotus, the world’s first historian, who embarked on journeys that were “the means by which he hopes to learn about the world and its inhabitants, to gather the knowledge he will feel compelled” (Kapuscinski 79). Kapuscinski is an example of learning from experience. Another travel writer, Rolf Potts demonstrates experiential learning in his book, Marco Polo Didn’t Go There: Stories and Revelations from One Decade as a Postmodern Travel Writer, by noting the significance of attending local festivals to help learn about the culture in a village. Experience is key to human education, no matter how traditional and nontraditional educations implement it. There are some things one cannot learn without experiencing them. Even Eric Liu, in his book, Guiding Lights: How to Mentor and Find Life’s Purpose, commented, “The people I encounte…

Education is one of the most difficult matters in human life, because it involves the society as a whole and the individual. People have many different ways of learning, and often these methods fall into what are called, traditional and nontraditional educations. Traditional education is to attend classes at school where there are teachers and pupils. Nontraditional education may involve traveling, hands-on experiences, or reading. However, these two types of education are based upon five components of education: experience, curiosity, mentoring, communication, and commitment.
No matter what we do or where we go, as long as we face new obstacles, we are learning. In Ryszard Kapuscinski’s Travels with Herodotus, Kapuscinski immerses himself in several different foreign countries, constantly picking up cues on the culture and mannerisms of the different people in the regions. Kapuscinski is inspired by Herodotus, the world’s first historian, who embarked on journeys that were “the means by which he hopes to learn about the world and its inhabitants, to gather the knowledge he will feel compelled” (Kapuscinski 79). Kapuscinski is an example of learning from experience. Another travel writer, Rolf Potts demonstrates experiential learning in his book, Marco Polo Didn’t Go There: Stories and Revelations from One Decade as a Postmodern Travel Writer, by noting the significance of attending local festivals to help learn about the culture in a village. Experience is key to human education, no matter how traditional and nontraditional educations implement it. There are some things one cannot learn without experiencing them. Even Eric Liu, in his book, Guiding Lights: How to Mentor and Find Life’s Purpose, commented, “The people I encounte…

The History of Gunpowder

The History of Gunpowder Essay: The History of Gunpowder
Language: English
Author: Paul Saez
Pages: 15
Rating: 4 stars

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The History of Gunpowder

It could easily be argued that one of the most important inventions or discoveries
in history has been gunpowder. And there are many things that can be argued about
gunpowder itself. Such as where was it originated, when was it originated, and how did it
spread across the world. These are three questions I will be looking at in this paper.
However the purpose of this paper is to prove that gunpowder gave rise to the powerful
western world while it inevitably left the China and the Eastern World behind.
It is generally determined that the discoverers of gunpowder were the Chinese. As
early as in the T’ang dynasty (AD 618-906) there seem to have existed what were called
“fire trees” and “silver flowers.” Chinese legend has it that some herdsmen who were
trying to keep warm saw their campfire leap and fizzle around like a torch. They soon
discovered that the fire pit was built on sulfur with a rock containing potassium
perchlorate, the ingredients of gunpowder. This soon became a common mixture to make
fire. To transport the mixture with so much firepower, the herdsman used a hollow
bamboo stick with mud at both ends. The stick, accidentally fell into a fire and exploded
with a bang. Thus the “fire trees” and “silver flowers” were born.
Later on in the year 1161, when the Chinese were suffering invasion from the Chin
Tatars from the north some historical documents state that they successfully used
explosives to defeat their attackers. This seems to be definite proof of a knowledge of
gunpowder among the Chinese at this period. However there has been considerable
argument as to whether these references to explosives indicate that the Chinese knew
about the use of a cannon and also i…

The History of Gunpowder

It could easily be argued that one of the most important inventions or discoveries
in history has been gunpowder. And there are many things that can be argued about
gunpowder itself. Such as where was it originated, when was it originated, and how did it
spread across the world. These are three questions I will be looking at in this paper.
However the purpose of this paper is to prove that gunpowder gave rise to the powerful
western world while it inevitably left the China and the Eastern World behind.
It is generally determined that the discoverers of gunpowder were the Chinese. As
early as in the T’ang dynasty (AD 618-906) there seem to have existed what were called
“fire trees” and “silver flowers.” Chinese legend has it that some herdsmen who were
trying to keep warm saw their campfire leap and fizzle around like a torch. They soon
discovered that the fire pit was built on sulfur with a rock containing potassium
perchlorate, the ingredients of gunpowder. This soon became a common mixture to make
fire. To transport the mixture with so much firepower, the herdsman used a hollow
bamboo stick with mud at both ends. The stick, accidentally fell into a fire and exploded
with a bang. Thus the “fire trees” and “silver flowers” were born.
Later on in the year 1161, when the Chinese were suffering invasion from the Chin
Tatars from the north some historical documents state that they successfully used
explosives to defeat their attackers. This seems to be definite proof of a knowledge of
gunpowder among the Chinese at this period. However there has been considerable
argument as to whether these references to explosives indicate that the Chinese knew
about the use of a cannon and also i…

Why Marco and Rodolfo Came to America in A View From the Bridge by Arthur Miller

Why Marco and Rodolfo Came to America in A View From the Bridge by Arthur Miller Essay: Why Marco and Rodolfo Came to America in A View From the Bridge by Arthur Miller
Language: English
Author: Anthony Cowden
Pages: 14
Rating: 5 stars

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Why Marco and Rodolfo Came to America in A View From the Bridge by Arthur Miller

The play A view from the bridge the author, Arthur Miller, is
presented to the audience as a tragedy but not a classical, a new,
modern tragedy. I still employs the elements well known to classical
tragedies but then it is set in the docks of America where illegal
immigrants are not uncommon to be hiding. There are many cultural
issues surrounding the play and the modern tragedy genre like the way
that different cultures treat justice, in America there are laws and
anyone who breaks them goes to jail but these laws are not always good
enough as Alfieri says on Eddie’s first visit to him “the law is very
specific”, it does not deal with every situation, The Sicilians treat
justice by taking the law into their own hands and getting even in
their own way. The Sicilians arrived in America in the first place to
search for the ‘American Dream’ of a job, money, welcome and hope for
the people left behind back home. The genre of modern tragedy uses a
protagonist, like classical tragedies, in the form of Eddie. Miller
uses him to focus on the frailty of human nature, how humans often do
not know their own feelings so cannot see what they are doing wrong:
Eddie, when told by Alfieri “she wants to get married, Eddie. She
can’t marry you, can she?”, his answer of “What’re you talkin’ about,
marry me! I don’t know what the hell you’re talkin’ about” is
indignant and the audience sees that Alfieri has noticed what Eddie
just does not see about himself.

The tragic elements used to make A View from the Bridge into a modern
tragedy are taken from the old Greek classic…

Why Marco and Rodolfo Came to America in A View From the Bridge by Arthur Miller

The play A view from the bridge the author, Arthur Miller, is
presented to the audience as a tragedy but not a classical, a new,
modern tragedy. I still employs the elements well known to classical
tragedies but then it is set in the docks of America where illegal
immigrants are not uncommon to be hiding. There are many cultural
issues surrounding the play and the modern tragedy genre like the way
that different cultures treat justice, in America there are laws and
anyone who breaks them goes to jail but these laws are not always good
enough as Alfieri says on Eddie’s first visit to him “the law is very
specific”, it does not deal with every situation, The Sicilians treat
justice by taking the law into their own hands and getting even in
their own way. The Sicilians arrived in America in the first place to
search for the ‘American Dream’ of a job, money, welcome and hope for
the people left behind back home. The genre of modern tragedy uses a
protagonist, like classical tragedies, in the form of Eddie. Miller
uses him to focus on the frailty of human nature, how humans often do
not know their own feelings so cannot see what they are doing wrong:
Eddie, when told by Alfieri “she wants to get married, Eddie. She
can’t marry you, can she?”, his answer of “What’re you talkin’ about,
marry me! I don’t know what the hell you’re talkin’ about” is
indignant and the audience sees that Alfieri has noticed what Eddie
just does not see about himself.

The tragic elements used to make A View from the Bridge into a modern
tragedy are taken from the old Greek classic…

Factors Affecting Cultural Exchange Through Civilizations during 1000 and 1400 A.D.

Factors Affecting Cultural Exchange Through Civilizations during 1000 and 1400 A.D. Essay: Factors Affecting Cultural Exchange Through Civilizations during 1000 and 1400 A.D.
Language: English
Author: Susan Demaree
Pages: 17
Rating: 3 stars

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Through analyzing the five given documents, factors affecting cultural exchange through civilizations during 1000 and 1400 A.D. are noticeably those which result in the bringing of new ideas to a different area, such as missionary work, commerce, war, and travels. As new religions sprouted throughout Europe on other expansive areas, missionaries were sent out to foreign lands. Document 1 comes from the viewpoint of a Roman Catholic missionary attempting to spread his faith by presenting a letter from the pope to the emperor of the Tatars. This shows that by converting a powerful leader to your faith, such as an emperor, it is easier for others to follow said faith. Documents 2 and 4 also emphasize how travel can be accountable for the exchange of ideas between cultures. Both Ibn Battuta and Marco Polo traveled extensive distances, stopping in various cities. Throughout their journeys, they carried their ideas with them, but were also introduced to the ideas of the people in the places they were visiting. Document 3 presents what is most likely the culprit for the increase in cultural diffusion during 1000 to 1400 A.D. War is often the reason for major cultural diffusion because, as new lands are conquered and the people of that land are put under the rule of a different people, the beliefs, traditions, and cultures of the conquerors mesh with those of the conquered. Document 5 also introduces a driving force in cultural diffusion – commerce. During this time period, many people were traders. Products made by a people are characteristics of their culture, whether it is the skill, intelligence, cleverness, or religious inclination of those people. As traders made their way to foreign lands to conduct business, whole empires were int…

Through analyzing the five given documents, factors affecting cultural exchange through civilizations during 1000 and 1400 A.D. are noticeably those which result in the bringing of new ideas to a different area, such as missionary work, commerce, war, and travels. As new religions sprouted throughout Europe on other expansive areas, missionaries were sent out to foreign lands. Document 1 comes from the viewpoint of a Roman Catholic missionary attempting to spread his faith by presenting a letter from the pope to the emperor of the Tatars. This shows that by converting a powerful leader to your faith, such as an emperor, it is easier for others to follow said faith. Documents 2 and 4 also emphasize how travel can be accountable for the exchange of ideas between cultures. Both Ibn Battuta and Marco Polo traveled extensive distances, stopping in various cities. Throughout their journeys, they carried their ideas with them, but were also introduced to the ideas of the people in the places they were visiting. Document 3 presents what is most likely the culprit for the increase in cultural diffusion during 1000 to 1400 A.D. War is often the reason for major cultural diffusion because, as new lands are conquered and the people of that land are put under the rule of a different people, the beliefs, traditions, and cultures of the conquerors mesh with those of the conquered. Document 5 also introduces a driving force in cultural diffusion – commerce. During this time period, many people were traders. Products made by a people are characteristics of their culture, whether it is the skill, intelligence, cleverness, or religious inclination of those people. As traders made their way to foreign lands to conduct business, whole empires were int…

How Did the Two Failed 1992 Coup d’Etat Attempts Led By Hugo Chavez Help His Political Career?

How Did the Two Failed 1992 Coup d’Etat Attempts Led By Hugo Chavez Help His Political Career? Essay: How Did the Two Failed 1992 Coup d’Etat Attempts Led By Hugo Chavez Help His Political Career?
Language: English
Author: Paul Mason
Pages: 10
Rating: 3 stars

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Plan of Investigation

How did the two failed 1992 coup d’état attempts led by Hugo Chavez help his political career? This investigation will answer the question by analyzing two results of the failed coups, first, that the coups exposed the corruption, failures and weakness of President Perez and his government, second, that the coups presented an image to the Venezuelan people of a dynamic, charismatic and populist leader in the person of Chavez. The most important sources used will be contemporary press accounts, Chavez’s speech and reactions from ordinary Venezuelan people at the time.

This investigation will not assess the conditions or conflicts of any surrounding country at the time.

Summary of Evidence

Setting & Causes
1948 – 1958: Marco Perez Jimenez leads military dictatorship
overthrown by the military and established democratic regime
from 1958 to 1992 Venezuela had experienced uninterrupted civilian rule
did have more than a dozen minor coup attempts on the early 60s, the country’s elected leaders managed to consolidate the democratic rule and keep military loyal
an export economy: reliant on high oil prices to sell in the market
Income differentiation among members of the military deepened, as it had for the rest of the population. Senior officers received lucrative salaries while their junior colleagues saw their purchasing power steadily decrease. In addition, the military high command was also implicated in corrupt dealings
Coup Makers and their Motives
The income differentiation between members of the army made junior and middle ranking officers very upset and eventually led to leftist ideology being accepted.
The country’s military intelligence knew about the group COMACATE (derived f…

Plan of Investigation

How did the two failed 1992 coup d’état attempts led by Hugo Chavez help his political career? This investigation will answer the question by analyzing two results of the failed coups, first, that the coups exposed the corruption, failures and weakness of President Perez and his government, second, that the coups presented an image to the Venezuelan people of a dynamic, charismatic and populist leader in the person of Chavez. The most important sources used will be contemporary press accounts, Chavez’s speech and reactions from ordinary Venezuelan people at the time.

This investigation will not assess the conditions or conflicts of any surrounding country at the time.

Summary of Evidence

Setting & Causes
1948 – 1958: Marco Perez Jimenez leads military dictatorship
overthrown by the military and established democratic regime
from 1958 to 1992 Venezuela had experienced uninterrupted civilian rule
did have more than a dozen minor coup attempts on the early 60s, the country’s elected leaders managed to consolidate the democratic rule and keep military loyal
an export economy: reliant on high oil prices to sell in the market
Income differentiation among members of the military deepened, as it had for the rest of the population. Senior officers received lucrative salaries while their junior colleagues saw their purchasing power steadily decrease. In addition, the military high command was also implicated in corrupt dealings
Coup Makers and their Motives
The income differentiation between members of the army made junior and middle ranking officers very upset and eventually led to leftist ideology being accepted.
The country’s military intelligence knew about the group COMACATE (derived f…

The Politics of Marco Rubio

The Politics of Marco Rubio Essay: The Politics of Marco Rubio
Language: English
Author: Paul Mason
Pages: 13
Rating: 3 stars

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On November 2, 2010 Marco Rubio was elected to the U.S. Senate to represent Florida, receiving 48.9% of the votes. Marco Rubio is currently part of the U.S Senate, and won’t face another election until 2016. He was first elected to the Florida House on January 25, 2000. During the 2007 and 2008 legislative sessions Marco Rubio was the Speaker for Florida of House Representatives. For the 2006-2008 terms, Rubio was elected Speaker of the Florida State House in November 2006. Marco Rubio is a part of the Republican Party and is a Capitalist.
Body:
Marco Rubio was born on May 28, 1971 in Miami, Florida after his parents fled Cuba when Fidel Castro took over. At the age of eight, his family moved to Las Vegas where his father worked as a bartender for Sam’s Town, and his mom worked as a housekeeper at the Imperial Palace. Six months later, in 1985, they moved back to Miami where his father continued to work as a bartender at the Mayfair House Hotel all the way till 1997. After that his dad worked as a school crossing guard until he retired in 2005. Rubio’s mother worked as a Kmart stock clerk until she retired in 1995.
In 1989, Marco Rubio graduated from South Miami Senior High School. He attended Tarkio College in Missouri for one year receiving a football scholarship. Rubio later returned to Florida to attend Santa Fe Community College. He ended up graduating from the University of Florida in 1993 with a bachelor of science. Rubio also earned his juris doctor, cum laude in 1996 from the University of Miami. Marco Rubio is married to his high school sweetheart, Jeanette
Research Paper
Dousdebes Rubio, who is an ex-Miami Dolphins cheerleader. Rubio and his wife had four children, Amanda, Daniella, Anthony and Dominick. He and…

On November 2, 2010 Marco Rubio was elected to the U.S. Senate to represent Florida, receiving 48.9% of the votes. Marco Rubio is currently part of the U.S Senate, and won’t face another election until 2016. He was first elected to the Florida House on January 25, 2000. During the 2007 and 2008 legislative sessions Marco Rubio was the Speaker for Florida of House Representatives. For the 2006-2008 terms, Rubio was elected Speaker of the Florida State House in November 2006. Marco Rubio is a part of the Republican Party and is a Capitalist.
Body:
Marco Rubio was born on May 28, 1971 in Miami, Florida after his parents fled Cuba when Fidel Castro took over. At the age of eight, his family moved to Las Vegas where his father worked as a bartender for Sam’s Town, and his mom worked as a housekeeper at the Imperial Palace. Six months later, in 1985, they moved back to Miami where his father continued to work as a bartender at the Mayfair House Hotel all the way till 1997. After that his dad worked as a school crossing guard until he retired in 2005. Rubio’s mother worked as a Kmart stock clerk until she retired in 1995.
In 1989, Marco Rubio graduated from South Miami Senior High School. He attended Tarkio College in Missouri for one year receiving a football scholarship. Rubio later returned to Florida to attend Santa Fe Community College. He ended up graduating from the University of Florida in 1993 with a bachelor of science. Rubio also earned his juris doctor, cum laude in 1996 from the University of Miami. Marco Rubio is married to his high school sweetheart, Jeanette
Research Paper
Dousdebes Rubio, who is an ex-Miami Dolphins cheerleader. Rubio and his wife had four children, Amanda, Daniella, Anthony and Dominick. He and…

Comparing Soccer and Water Polo

Comparing Soccer and Water Polo Essay: Comparing Soccer and Water Polo
Language: English
Author: Chelsea Hudkins
Pages: 8
Rating: 5 stars

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The history of sports dates back before the discovery of America or even the birth of Jesus Christ. Sports have been in a constant evolution ever since their introduction to the world, such as Tsu’Chu to soccer or polo to water polo. Although soccer and water polo are popular in America today many athletes have come to love these two unique sports. Both sports are physically exhausting, demanding all an athlete has to offer to the game. They test the limit of the body and push it into the next level of competition. To a new comer these two vicious sports seem drastically different, but when it comes to the basics no two sports could be more alike.
Soccer is a sport widely known and loved throughout Europe, but little in the United States. It is a sport restricting players to only their feet, and zero contact with their hands. Played on grass or turf fields with two teams of eleven giving all they have for all ninety minutes of the game. Teams wear matching uniforms so they can tell who is on which team at a glance. Soccer players must also arm themselves with shin pads to protect themselves. To men and women who do not follow the sport, it may seem quiet easy, but in reality it is far from it. The use of body movements and tricky footwork are used to throw off your defender and advance your team onto the opponents side. Defenders are more than willing to throw there body at an offensive player, elbow them, or even kick at their shins just to take control of the ball. Soccer also has many restrictions and regulations to how far a player can go. A defender slide tackling an offensive player on a break away could result in a yellow card, which is considered a minor offense if the defender is only presented with the card once. But i…

The history of sports dates back before the discovery of America or even the birth of Jesus Christ. Sports have been in a constant evolution ever since their introduction to the world, such as Tsu’Chu to soccer or polo to water polo. Although soccer and water polo are popular in America today many athletes have come to love these two unique sports. Both sports are physically exhausting, demanding all an athlete has to offer to the game. They test the limit of the body and push it into the next level of competition. To a new comer these two vicious sports seem drastically different, but when it comes to the basics no two sports could be more alike.
Soccer is a sport widely known and loved throughout Europe, but little in the United States. It is a sport restricting players to only their feet, and zero contact with their hands. Played on grass or turf fields with two teams of eleven giving all they have for all ninety minutes of the game. Teams wear matching uniforms so they can tell who is on which team at a glance. Soccer players must also arm themselves with shin pads to protect themselves. To men and women who do not follow the sport, it may seem quiet easy, but in reality it is far from it. The use of body movements and tricky footwork are used to throw off your defender and advance your team onto the opponents side. Defenders are more than willing to throw there body at an offensive player, elbow them, or even kick at their shins just to take control of the ball. Soccer also has many restrictions and regulations to how far a player can go. A defender slide tackling an offensive player on a break away could result in a yellow card, which is considered a minor offense if the defender is only presented with the card once. But i…

Margaret Walker

Margaret Walker Essay: Margaret Walker
Language: English
Author: Paul Saez
Pages: 6
Rating: 4 stars

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In 1942, Margaret Walker won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award for her poem For My People. This accomplishment heralded the beginning of Margaret Walker’s literary career which spanned from the brink of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1930s to the cusp of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s (Gates and McKay 1619). Through her fiction and poetry, Walker became a prominent voice in the African-American community. Her writing, especially her signature novel, Jubilee, exposes her readers to the plight of her race by accounting the struggles of African Americans from the pre-Civil War period to the present and ultimately keeps this awareness relevant to contemporary American society.
Margaret Walker was born on July 7, 1915 in Birmingham, Alabama to Reverend Sigismund C. Walker and Marion Dozier Walker (Gates and McKay 1619). Her father, a scholarly Methodist minister, passed onto her his passion for literature. Her mother, a music teacher, gifted her with an innate sense of rhythm through music and storytelling. Her parents not only provided a supportive environment throughout her childhood but also emphasized the values of education, religion, and black culture. Much of Walker’s ability to realistically write about African American life can be traced back to her early exposure to her black heritage. Born in Alabama, she was deeply influenced by the Harlem Renaissance and received personal encouragement from Langston Hughes. During the Depression, she worked for the WPA Federal Writers Project and assists Richard Wright, becoming his close friend and later, biographer. In 1942, she was the first African American to win the Yale Younger Poets award for her poem For My People (Gates and McKay 1619). Her publishing career halted for…

In 1942, Margaret Walker won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award for her poem For My People. This accomplishment heralded the beginning of Margaret Walker’s literary career which spanned from the brink of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1930s to the cusp of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s (Gates and McKay 1619). Through her fiction and poetry, Walker became a prominent voice in the African-American community. Her writing, especially her signature novel, Jubilee, exposes her readers to the plight of her race by accounting the struggles of African Americans from the pre-Civil War period to the present and ultimately keeps this awareness relevant to contemporary American society.
Margaret Walker was born on July 7, 1915 in Birmingham, Alabama to Reverend Sigismund C. Walker and Marion Dozier Walker (Gates and McKay 1619). Her father, a scholarly Methodist minister, passed onto her his passion for literature. Her mother, a music teacher, gifted her with an innate sense of rhythm through music and storytelling. Her parents not only provided a supportive environment throughout her childhood but also emphasized the values of education, religion, and black culture. Much of Walker’s ability to realistically write about African American life can be traced back to her early exposure to her black heritage. Born in Alabama, she was deeply influenced by the Harlem Renaissance and received personal encouragement from Langston Hughes. During the Depression, she worked for the WPA Federal Writers Project and assists Richard Wright, becoming his close friend and later, biographer. In 1942, she was the first African American to win the Yale Younger Poets award for her poem For My People (Gates and McKay 1619). Her publishing career halted for…